Oviduct Prolapse

by Melanie
(Greensburg, PA)

One of my chickens has, after doing some research, a prolapsed oviduct. I immediately separated her from the flock and have her in our house in a nice hay-filled box. It was only prolapsed about an inch or so and she seems to be doing fine. She's been in the house for about 5 days now. I've been keeping mineral oil and Preparation H on the prolapse and it has gone back in except for the very end which is a little larger and rounded. It has gotten kind of dark and harder, sort of like a scab, maybe just not quite that hard. Has anyone encountered anything like this? Could this be a scab? Is that OK? I'm hoping it will fall off and she'll be fine, but I don't know.


I took her to the vet immediately who told me she needed to be wormed and didn't do anything else. I'm SURE that's not the problem. So I'm hoping another chicken enthusiast out there can give me some better advice.

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Mar 23, 2010
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Prolapse Outcome
by: Anonymous

Hi! My Ziggy is all healed and back out with the other girls. I tried to do a combination of several different things I had read also. I bathed her everyday, then put on some mineral oil to help keep the area from drying out. On top of that, I put Preparation H on liberally. I think that helped all the swelling to keep going down. Then I squirted a little sugar water around the vent to try that also. Someone said honey works well, too because the stickiness keeps things from drying out. Basically, you have to wait out the scab. Don't pick it until it's really ready to come off. Once it came off, the prolapse had shrunk from all the Prep. H, etc, and I gave it a little push back in and it popped right back in there and has been fine ever since. Good luck with your girls!

Mar 20, 2010
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having same problem with prolapse
by: Anonymous

Two of my banty silies are having the same problem.I have Gail Dammerow's book and have been following her advice. Also on Backyard Chicken forum several people say they have used honey or sugar with good success. I tried it but my girls are still not keeping their stuff in. I also wondered about the "scabbing". I have been bathing my girls(they love it) and while cleaning them there appeared to be some tissue that just peeled off.So, I have been applying neosporin also. I know that when exposed too long the tissue can kinda dry out and maybe become necrotic. It is hard to keep enough ointment on them, even though I apply it about 3 times a day.This is day 3 for me.I am feeding oyster shell and have been giving the girls a dose of Nutidrench daily as it contains calcium too. Also giving duramycin in their water.Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.

Mar 13, 2010
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Meat Meal source
by: Anonymous

Hi again
I can sometimes get meat meal from the larger livestock feed stores (we call them stockfeed stores here). It is not that expensive. However it does attract beatles and weevils which is why many stockfeed places don't stock it. You'll have to phone around. Otherwise, some garden supply places may have the blood and bone, but it is normally not pure but supplemented with urea which would not be good for your birds. Worth checking if all else fails though :)

Mar 12, 2010
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meat meal
by: blessedwith1

Thanks for your comments, Meg. Can you tell me where I could get meat meal or bone & blood?

Mar 10, 2010
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How to treat it
by: Meg

According to the info below, you are doing all the right things. I would also add to it that as far as prevention goes, you may need to add some sources of calcium and magnesium to your feed ration. I haven't had experience with hens prolapsing, but know that cows, dogs, goats etc may do so if they are short on those minerals. A bit of blood and bone (pure) or meat meal would be a good source of both and could be mixed into a mash for them.

Cheers, Meg

The following is from "The Chicken Health Handbook" by Gail Damerow ISBN: 0-88266-611-8.

"Prolapsed Oviduct, also called "blowout" or "pickout" is a condition in which the lower part of the hen's oviduct turns inside out and protrudes through the vent. Prolapse occurs most often when a hen starts laying at too young an age, is too fat, or lays unusually large eggs. Caught in time, the prolapse can sometimes be reversed by applying a hemorrhoidal cream (such as Preparation H) and isolating the hen until she approves. Otherwise, the other chickens will pick at her vent, eventually pulling out her oviduct and intestines and causing the hen to die from hemorrhage and shock. Not all vent picking is due to prolapse, but instead may result from faulty management - feeders, waterers and roosts may be positioned in such a way that birds below can pick on the vents of birds above."

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